Tag Archives: Lorraine Godsmark

Today’s cake – pear and ginger brown butter tarts

peartart2

When you read pastry recipes, there is a lot of ‘relaxing’ going on. Which is quite ironic really, because I don’t find myself relaxing – I’m usually huffing and puffing and thinking “this bloody pastry better work out”. So maybe I should take the cue from the recipe and chill a little. I read recently that Gwyneth Paltrow said we shouldn’t yell at water because we “might hurt its feelings” (really, Gwyneth?), so perhaps the pastry can sense my anxiety?

Following the pastry class I went to with Lorraine Godsmark, I decided I would try to make the pear tart with the sour cream pastry at home – that evening we only made the base pastry and not the fillings or toppings, so time to try it myself without The Master’s watchful eye.  In the class she described this pastry as “very forgiving” – and it is too – so it’s a really good one to tackle first up. It comes together nicely, doesn’t stick to the bench, lifts easily into the tin and you can bash it about a bit. Ta da!  And as Lorraine suggested, I filled my tin to the very brim.

pastry1pastry2

In terms of the pear filling – the method she gives isn’t very descriptive (no chef is ever going to give away all their secrets, are they?). For instance, the Buderim ginger comes in chunks, is it meant to be cooked with the pears then removed from the mixture (as it wouldn’t be great to bite into a whole piece), or chopped finely and left? I opted to remove the pieces after cooking. I also found that there was quite a lot of liquid after cooking so I strained the pears.  And the brown butter topping – which is so so delicious – I discovered runs as soon as it starts cooking.  I had heaped my pears into a little mound, which turned out to be not a good idea.  Make sure they are in a very flat layer, and perhaps a couple of millimetres below the top of the pastry case, so that when you pipe on the brown butter topping it can’t really go anywhere. Because it ran, my pears are sticking out a little at the top, whereas they should be completely covered.

Make the pastry and the brown butter topping the day before and the pears the day of cooking. The pastry was enough to make 1 large tart and 4 x 12cm tarts, but the pear compote quantity was just enough for 1 large tart, you’d probably need to double it to have enough for all the pastry.  This was seriously some of the best pastry I have ever had, and the brown butter topping is to die for.  Definitely worth perfecting, and will also try it with apple.

Cream Cheese Pastry (make the day before)
300g plain flour
Pinch of salt
¼ teaspoon baking powder
170g unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
130g cream cheese, cut into cubes about twice the size of the butter
30g ice water
30g apple cider vinegar

1. Place flour, salt and baking powder in a food processor, pulse for a couple of seconds to sift.
2. Add the cream cheese and pulse for 2-3 seconds
3. Add butter and pulse for further 2-3 seconds
4. Combine water and vinegar and add to mixture and pulse for a final couple of seconds.
5. Turn mixture out onto bench, and using the heel of your hand smear the dough (fresage) across the bench forming streaks of butter and cream cheese through the dough. Use a pastry cutter to bring the mixture back to you and smear another two times. It will be slightly marbled which is fine. (You can find some examples of how to fresage on youtube).
6. Press into a flat disc and allow the pastry to relax in the fridge overnight
7. Remove from fridge and roll out onto a surface 5mm thick. Fit into a flan tin and allow it to relax in the fridge for a further 2 hours

Brown butter topping (make the day before)
3 eggs
200g caster sugar
80g plain flour
185g unsalted butter
1 vanilla bean, split down the middle with a knife

1. Using an electric mixer, whisk eggs and sugar until thick and pale. Lower speed and mix in flour.
2. Meanwhile place butter in a small pot, add vanilla bean and heat over a medium-high heat until butter is brown and foamy. Continue until bubbles subside and colour turns dark golden and has a nutty aroma. Strain the butter through a sieve onto the egg mix whisking continuously until well combined. Refrigerate overnight

Pear and Ginger Compote (make the day of baking)
1kg pears
80g unsalted butter
40g sugar
100ml lemon juice
80g ginger in syrup
80g candied orange or marmalade

Peel, core and cut pears into 2cm cubes. Melt butter in a wide saute pan, add pears and cook over high heat for 5 minutes. Add sugar and cook until pears are soft. Deglaze pan with lemon juice, add ginger and marmalade and allow to reduce for 5 minutes. Allow to cool and refrigerate until required.

Blind baking and assembly
1. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C.
2. Remove your prepared tart tin from the fridge and prick the pastry lightly with a fork
3. Spray a sheet of foil with canola oil spray and place it in the tin. Fill to the brim with baking beans or rice and bake for 20 minutes
4. Remove from oven and remove beans and foil. Lightly beat an egg and using a pastry brush lightly brush the pastry with the egg. Put back in the oven for a further 15-20 minutes until golden
5. Remove from oven, fill with pear, then pipe a thin layer of the burnt butter topping to cover the pear, and return to the oven for 45 minutes then lower the oven the 160 degrees for 15 minutes

peartart1

 

Pastry class with Lorraine Godsmark @ Accoutrement

Confident. Knowledgeable. Precise. That about sums up Lorraine Godsmark, a recognised pastry maestro in Australia, from Lorraine’s Patisserie. I’m here with a friend at the Accoutrement cooking school in Mosman for Lorraine’s pastry class. One of Accoutrement’s most popular classes,  it sells out months in advance.

Pastry has always been a bit of a nemesis of mine. I can whip up a cake or a batch of biscotti with reasonable ease these days, and although I’ve tried a few tarts, I can never be confident about the outcome, and if my effort will result in a ball of unmalleable flour and butter ending up in the bin. So who better to learn from? There are fourteen of us in the class, nice and intimate, one of whom is a very entertaining Lorraine Groupie who has followed her from shop to shop over the years.

The evening is peppered with lots of great tips, anecdotes from her time at Rockpool where it all began, and how she learned over the years from her mistakes – so she encourages us to all watch each other’s pastry making, pointing out what we need to be aware of and helping us individually with our technique . Mildly critical of modern cookbooks, she thinks recipes are often shortened by publishers to appear simple and doable for the home cook, often leading to disasters in things like pastry where precision is a must – she takes account of the fact, for example, that an egg shell weighs approximately 5 grams. For that reason Lorraine is a big fan of Rose Levy Beranbaum’s books, which are very exact in their instructions.

That night, over the course of the three hours, we go through making three pastries, and have plenty of opportunities to ask questions. We only have time to make the pastry – which we get to take home – not the fillings, but the cooked final result is given to us to try (“and here’s one we prepared earlier”).

The first is a cream cheese pastry, which, as it contains no sugar, can be used for sweet or savoury. She gives us plenty useful tips
* Take your butter out of the fridge about half an hour before so that it is still hard, but not rock solid
* For this pastry she likes butter with high water content, such as Western Star, as this creates steam during the cooking process which leads to flaky pastry
* Don’t knead pastry dough. Always use a pastry cutter (which the lovely Sue from Accoutrement gave us to take home). For almost all her pastries, she uses a French technique called fresage, which involves pushing the pastry mixture in long streaks with the heal of your hand – she is very anti brining your pastry to a crumb in a food processor like in most recipes
Another common mistake is making our dough into a ball before we refrigerate it, which means it needs to be worked more when it comes to rolling time. She prefers to shape it into a flattish circle
* “Relax” your dough in the fridge for at least 2 hours or overnight before you roll it out to put into your tart tins
If you are making a big batch of pastry, after it has been relaxed it can be frozen. The best thing for frozen dough is to defrost it in the fridge overnight before use. Uncooked pastry freezes very well.
* Most recipes tell you to line your baking tin with baking paper for blind baking. She always chooses foil (spray it with a bit of canola first) as it is easy to shape right into the tin crevices, and make sure it is full to the brim with baking beads. Often we think our pastry shrinks, but it’s actually the lack of support while it is baking that causes it to lose shape rather than shrink

lorraine1

lorraine2

This pastry is used for pear and ginger brown butter tarts, that have a brown butter topping. Words can’t describe how devine these are!

lorraine3

The second pastry is called a Pate Sucre. She says its as close as she’ll get to giving away the date tart pastry recipe. Again for this a butter with a high water content is best. She describes this as a much “fattier” pastry, as unlike the first one it contains sugar, eggs and milk in addition to the butter. This one is also made using the fresage technique. Lorraine believes in minimising machine use for pastry.  Other than literally 10 seconds of pulsing in a food processor – it is all handworked, and when I see for myself what goes into it I fully appreciate why a slice of the date tart is $15. We try a quince franjipane tart made with this pastry. It is soooooooooooo flaky. Oh, she recommends cutting tarts with a hot knife – apparently at the bakery they heat up the knives before slicing.

lorraine4

The final pastry is a shortbread pastry, and for this one she recommends cultured butter. This has a different technique and involves whipping sugar and egg yolks to begin with. Its more of a biscuit type base, and I definitely prefer the first two. We try a salted caramel with a macadamia tart made with it, just gorgeous. “You’ll have to wait for the book to come out to get the filling recipe for that one”, Lorraine says, laughing (nudge nudge wink wink to publishers).

lorraine5

Such a wonderful evening! Stay tuned, I’ll be trying the complete recipes at home myself.

Accoutrement, 611 Military Rd, Mosman Ph (02) 9969 4911
http://www.accoutrement.com.au

Lorraine’s Patisserie, Shop 5, Palings Lane, Sydney, Ph (02) 9254 8009
http://www.merivale.com.au/lorraines-patisserie/

Today’s Cake – Neil Perry’s Date Tart

Following a recent visit to Rockpool on George, I thought I’d give the date tart a go. This recipe is definitely a keeper – though I need another go to perfect it as I got a lot of pastry shrinkage so I didn’t get enough filling in. I also recommend flattening the dates so that they are covered. Note that although this is often referred to “Neil Perry’s date tart”, having been on the menu for some 25 years at Rockpool, it was actually the joint creation of Perry and Lorraine Godsmark, who was the pastry chef at Rockpool at the time. No idea how accurate this recipe is, but it was apparently published in a magazine some 15 years ago. What this recipe is missing is the fine layer of cake on top – I think this is something similar to the brown butter topping in Lorraine’s pear and ginger tart – at a guess you would bake until the custard is partially set, pipe on the topping and return to the oven.

IMG_3890

Filling
10 fresh dates, pitted and halved
7 egg yolks
80g caster sugar
700ml fresh cream
½ vanilla bean, split lengthwise

Pastry
180g cold butter, chopped roughly
25g caster sugar
1 egg
1 tbs milk
250g plain flour, sifted

Making it
1. For pastry combine butter, sugar, egg and milk in a food processor and process until butter is in small lumps. Add flour and process until mixture just comes together in a ball.

2. Gently knead pastry on a lightly floured surface to from a smooth ball. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 2 hours.

3. Roll out pastry on a lightly floured surface and line a 25mm deep round 28cm flan tin (with removable base). Cover and refrigerate for ½ hour.

4. Place tart shell on an oven tray, line with baking paper, fill with dried beans or rice and bake at 200C for 10 minutes. Remove paper and beans and bake a further 10 minutes or until golden.

5.  Meanwhile, cream egg yolks and sugar until light and fluffy, then stir in cream and seeds from the vanilla bean.

6. Place dates on pastry in two circles. Pour cream mixture into tart shell, to cover dates, then bake at 180C for about 30 minutes, or until just set. Cool to room temperature before serving.