Category Archives: Eating in

Mushroom and filo scroll

Always on the hunt for good vegetarian recipes for The Marito, I thought I’d give this recipe, courtesy of Belinda Jeffrey, a try. I did make a few changes, using less butter, less and lite sour cream and skipping the garlic. You’ll serve 4-6 with this, more if part of a banquet. I think this is one of those versatile “any time of the day” dishes – it would easily work for breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner, or a late night supper! I used a good variety of mushrooms – other than standard cup I used oyster, Swiss brown, enoki, shemeji and shiitake, about half cup and half the others. It can turn into a costly dish if you go all exotic varieties, and nothing wrong with just using standard cup for the whole thing.

Ingredients
Mushroom filling
80ml olive oil
50g unsalted butter
2 medium brown onions, finely diced
1kg mushrooms sliced
100g lite sour cream
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
lemon juice, to taste (optional)
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1/4 cup (about 15g) tightly packed finely chopped dill
60g pecans, coarsely chopped

Pastry
12 sheets filo pastry
100g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
Poppy seeds for sprinkling

Making it
1. First make the filling. Place the oil and butter in a large frypan on medium heat, then add the onion and cook for 8-10 minutes or until softened. Then add the mushrooms and cook for 15 or so minutes. All the juices will need to evaporate or your scroll will be soggy.
2. Remove the pan from the heat and add the sour cream, mustard, lemon juice (I just used a squeeze), season with salt and pepper and combine all ingredients. Allow the mixture to cool and once cool add the dill and the nuts
3. Pre-heat the oven to 190 degrees. Place some baking paper on a baking tray and place your 12 filo sheets on a slightly damp tea towel.
4. Take one filo sheet, lightly butter, then place another sheet, until you have three sheets. Repeat so that you have four lots of three sheets. Divide your mushroom mixture into four and spoon in a “log” shape down one long side of the filo. Then roll each of the four lots into logs. Take the first log and shape it into a coil and place it on your baking tray. (You can if you like place the logs inside a springform cake tin to ensure it holds its shape). Lightly butter the outside edge so that the next log sticks and then coil the next log and the next and you’ll end up with a large coil. Brush the top with butter, season the top with a bit of salt and pepper and sprinkle the poppy seeds. Bake for about 40 minutes or until the filo is nice and golden. Slide it onto a serving plate. I find it is easiest to cut using a serrated knife.

In My Kitchen, January 2018

Kicking off with the first 2018 edition of In My Kitchen, a global monthly link up currently hosted by Sherry’s Pickings which gives a peek into kitchens around the world.  Here’s what’s in the Napoli kitchen this month.

We were dragged to the Boxing Day Sales by our Small People who were very keen to spend some of their Christmas gift vouchers.  The Marito and I picked up a new NutriBullet as our previous one had died after a good few years of use.  Beginning the year with good intentions to counter Christmas excess, we’ve been starting our day with various vegetable and fruit blends.  My go to has been beetroot, baby spinach, a bit of mango and plain yoghurt.

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In my kitchen is a very sad looking tomato plant we are trying to revive.  At the house we are renting while the renovation is going on, there are some rather large trees.  We hear the possums scurrying at night and they have decimated everything we’ve tried to plant. Last night I think they may have been practicing for this year’s 2018 Commonwealth Games relay. I’ve put nets on things now, but we’re probably a bit late to get a good tomato crop. Anyone know any good natural possum deterrents?

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I recently saw at Coles a new line of pasta called Rana.  I have to say, for shop bought ravioli and tortellini, it’s among the best I’ve come across.  Really fine casings compared to others which tend to be on the thick side and cooks in a few minutes.

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In my kitchen is some beetroot marmalade a friend bought for us to try, it’s made in Tasmania. Being a marmalade, it is sweet, but works well on burgers and sandwiches, the Marito is a fan, we’ve already gone through half of it!

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Also from Tasmania is this apricot and Armagnac conserve that the Marito received in a Christmas hamper.  I’d love to use this as a glaze on a cake or a tart.

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In my kitchen are scraps for the girls and lettuce heads I am sprouting to grow for them (if the possums don’t eat them first, they’ve devoured all of my attempts so far).  They wait expectantly at the coop door every morning for my delivery, it’s quite funny.

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At the Italian deli this morning I picked up some buffalo ricotta….mmmmm……I will eat some as is on toast, but haven’t decided what to do with the rest.  Some fritters perhaps?

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I also bought some Caputo flour.  It’s meant to be the flour for pizza and I thought I’d try it; I will use my neverfail pizza dough recipe.

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And finally in my kitchen is some pasta made from chickpea flour.  I was watching a documentary about US startups and one of them was a company that made a chickpea pasta which was having huge success.  San Remo seem to be the only company here that do it and curiosity prompted me to try some.

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Wishing you all a happy 2018 filled with fun food adventures!

Panettone Pudding

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It’s a sure sign that Christmas is coming when the panettone start filling the stores.  Once upon a time you could only get them at specialty Italian grocers, but now they’ve gone mainstream, appearing in all supermarkets.   Each year new varieties appear – today at the deli I saw one with a pear and chocolate centre, one with a Strega centre, and one with a “Verona” almond crust.   I’m a bit of a traditionalist though, opting for the standard fruit or a pandoro.  Most of the time I eat it as is, but every now and again I like to do something a bit different – see a few of my ideas here.

Another nice idea if summer goes rogue and it’s a cool night, is this very easy panettone pudding.

Ingredients
1 750g panettone
3 eggs
600ml light thickened cream
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
20ml brandy
40g unsalted butter
Extra butter, for greasing
1/3 cup flaked almonds
Icing sugar, for dusting
Vanilla ice cream to serve

Making it
Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees fan forced

Grease a baking dish, then tear the panettone with your hands into medium size pieces and put into the dish.

In a bowl, whisk the eggs, cream, extracts and brandy until well combined. Pour over the panettone and allow to sit for a few minutes. Cut the butter into small pieces and dot the panettone with it. Place in the oven for about 40 minutes until it becomes golden.

Meanwhile, lightly toast the flaked almonds in a pan then set aside. (You could also sprinkle the almonds through uncooked beforehand, and bake rather than adding afterwards).

Remove the pudding from the oven, dust with icing sugar and sprinkle with the almonds. Serve as is or with vanilla ice cream.

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There’s a lot of potential variations in this – you could add mixed berries in for baking, or other nuts such as pistachio for texture.

Buon natale!

 

In My Kitchen, November 2017

Welcome to the November edition of In My Kitchen.  It is drizzling as I type, some much needed rain hitting Sydney after an almost thirty year record dry spell.

In my kitchen is today’s Daily Telegraph featuring none other than Mamma Rosa!  A couple of weeks ago The Sorella told me Delicious and The Telegraph were in search of family recipes.  As many of you know I have my special little book, so I sent in her crostoli.  She was chuffed (but would have preferred no picture!).

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In my kitchen are brochures brochures brochures.  A few weeks ago with demolition and excavation in full swing at our “grand old lady”, as I sometimes call our house (or more often, our “falling down house”) we moved out.  We were loathe to leave, but safety became an issue.  With not much yet done except the land being cleared – which was a much bigger job than we thought –  and the original house being stripped, the builders and others were already asking which appliances were going in, where I wanted power points, and where the plumbing needed to run so had we decided on taps and toilets.  I haven’t bought any major appliances or household goods for ten years so it was time to look around.  A lot has changed since then, and in some cases I think there are just too many bells and whistles – if you knock, sing or pirouette your dishwasher and/or oven door will open (the knocking one is true, the other two probably aren’t far behind).

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A few weeks ago I went to one of the Sandhurst Festival of Nonna dinners, which was just lovely. We were given a couple of jars of Nonna’s Sugo.  I’m not usually one for bottled sauces, most of them are very acidic, but this one was really good!

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In my kitchen are home grown avocados, courtesy of a colleague’s dad.  Can’t wait till they ripen so I can try them.

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Just outside my kitchen are pots of herbs.  The house we are renting didn’t have much in the way of garden beds, so pots it is for now. At the Festival of Nonna dinner we met the Torrisi family who are long time large scale basil growers, and they gave us an interesting tip – that when you water basil, you should avoid watering the leaves, it apparently grows better.   Can’t be helped in the rain of course, but good to know otherwise.

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That’s it from the Napoli kitchen this month.  IMK is a global monthly link up hosted by Sherry’s Pickings – thanks Sherry!

A Sunday Savoiardi extravaganza

My godmother (or comare in Italian), who I adore, is a fabulous cook.  Like Mamma Rosa and others who grew up in Italy in the decades following the second world war, they took simple ingredients, often home grown, and figured out firstly how to make them go as far as possible, and secondly how to make them as flavoursome as possible.  Once in Australia they adapted and learnt new things and new ingredients – comare’s spinach and ricotta cannelloni crepes are to die for –  but may of the traditions and recipes remain true.

Also like Mamma Rosa, comare is a damn good biscuit maker, both of them can whip up amaretti and crostoli like nobody’s business.

A while back my comare bought me a particular plate of biscuits that I loved and I wanted to learn how to make them.  She called them savoiardi but was quick to point out that they aren’t “savoiardi della nonna”, the traditional variety.  So this morning comare and I met half way in Mamma Rosa’s kitchen for a Sunday baking session. Laughs were had, stories were told, hugs were given.

In typical Italian handed down fashion, there isn’t a strict flour measure.  It’s the good old phrase you’ll find even now in many an Italian cookbook: the flour should be “quanto basta” or “quanto se ne prende” (literally “however much is enough” or “however much it takes”, both extremely useful measures). You need a piping bag for these, the mixture is sticky and difficult to handle – if it is easy to manage with your hands then you know you’ve gone too far on the flour.

My comare’s savoiardi

These use only yolks, so you’ll have a dozen whites to use – so often after making a batch of these she makes almond bread.

Ingredients
12 egg yolks from large eggs, at room temperature
1 slightly heaped cup of caster sugar
1 cup canola oil
1 cup Grand Marnier liquor
2 teaspoons baking powder
Approx. 450-500g self raising flour, sifted

Making them

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees fan forced and line a tray with baking paper
  2. Using an electric mixer, whisk the yolks, then add the caster sugar and whisk until thick.  Then add the canola oil and the liquor and continue to whisk until combined
  3. Finally add the sifted flour and the baking powder and combine.  The mixture should be reasonably thick but quite stickysavoiardi (2)
  4. Put the mixture into a piping bag with a large attachment for biscuits (ie not one for pastry decorating).  Comare had a bad ass version, have to get me one of these. You can go for either ridged or smooth, but the ridges largely disappear as they rise. savoiardi (1)
  5. Pipe the biscuits to the desired length and then put in the over for 10-15 minutes until golden.

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So so good.

After we whipped these ones up, comare says “let’s make the other ones too”.  Who am I to argue?

Savoiardi della Nonna

These follow largely the same method, just a slightly different mix of ingredients.

Ingredients
6 large eggs, at room temperature
1 slightly heaped cup of caster sugar
1 cup canola oil
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
Grated rind of 1 lemon
2 teaspoons baking powder
Approx. 500g self raising flour, sifted

Making them

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees fan forced and line a tray with baking paper
  2. Using an electric mixer, whisk the eggs, then add the caster sugar and whisk until thick.  Then add the canola oil, vanilla extract and lemon and  continue to whisk until combined
  3. Finally add the sifted flour and the baking powder and combine.  The mixture should be reasonably thick but quite sticky
  4. Put the mixture into a piping bag with a large attachment for biscuits and pipe the biscuits to the desired length and then put in the over for 10-15 minutes until golden.

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Thank you comare xxxx

In My Kitchen, September 2017

Spring has arrived and with it the September edition of IMK, a global monthly link up currently hosted by Sherry’s Pickings.   Here’s what is happening in the Napoli kitchen this month!

In my kitchen are lots of eggs. The girls are going great guns, and we are now occasionally in surplus, so it’s lovely to be able to give some home grown fresh eggs to people.  Rosie (aka The Unit) is producing double yolkers every now and again, while baby Grace produces these little mini pointy eggs.

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The Small People carefully collect the eggs from the nesting boxes every afternoon when they get home from school; they love the variation in size and colour and regularly send me photos of each day’s collection.

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Outside my kitchen window is an excavator.  It’s all systems go go go on the Grande Rinnovamento.  We are, I think, only the fourth family to own this grand old lady in it’s 127 year history.  These walls hold a lot of stories; the servant bells around the house with one for the “drawing room” speak of bygone eras, as does the little box at the back of the laundry with a door, which was once used for servant food deliveries. It is going to be a long, and no doubt sometimes complicated ride, but we are all very excited about it.

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In my kitchen is chocolate with white truffles, which the Sorella bought back from her recent trip to Croatia.  The fragrance when I opened the packet was incredible, and so was the taste, which was much more truffle than chocolate.

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I recently added to my cake tin stash with this great ridged tin.  It is a traditional shape for Amor Polenta cake which I made last week, but I’m sure other cakes will be great in it too.

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That’s it from my kitchen this month.  It’s going to be a busy few weeks as we plan to move out as the renovation accelerates, and onto a temporary kitchen until we can return.  Hope all my Australian readers have enjoyed a lovely Father’s Day today.

Today’s cake – Amor Polenta

Such a romantic sounding cake, one with the word love in the title.  Hailing from Lombardia in Italy’s north, it is not an extravagant cake, but typical of Cucina Povera where polenta or cornmeal was often used to take food a little bit further.   Traditionally Amor Polenta is prepared in a ridged cake tin, but no reason why you couldn’t use a normal loaf pan.  The tin I bought was a little too big for this quantity of mix, as the cake is usually nice and high, so next time I’ll make a double batch of mixture (or buy a smaller tin, but I think I’ll go with the double batch as it’s a gorgeous cake).   You need very very finely ground polenta or cornmeal for this, not the typical polenta used in savoury dishes, or you’ll get a very grainy texture.  The Strega – an Italian liquor and a favourite of Mamma Rosa, added a delightful subtle fragrance to it. The Marito loved it, so did I. This one is going to become a regular for sure.

Ingredients
120g caster sugar
100g unsalted butter, softened at room temperature
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
8g baking powder
100g fine cornmeal (polenta)
80g flour, tipo 00
70g almond meal
Splash of liquor such as Strega or rum
Icing sugar, for dusting

Making it

Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees and grease the tin with melted butter. Using an electric mixer, beat sugar and butter until combined then add the eggs and beat till nice and creamy. Add the vanilla and baking powder and combine. Add the cornmeal and combine, then the tipo 00 and combine, and then finally the almond. Lastly add the Strega. Pour the mixture into the tin and use a knife to smooth the batter. Bake for 25-30 minutes. Turn out onto a wire rack to cool and dust with icing sugar.