Panettone Pudding

panettonepudding3

It’s a sure sign that Christmas is coming when the panettone start filling the stores.  Once upon a time you could only get them at specialty Italian grocers, but now they’ve gone mainstream, appearing in all supermarkets.   Each year new varieties appear – today at the deli I saw one with a pear and chocolate centre, one with a Strega centre, and one with a “Verona” almond crust.   I’m a bit of a traditionalist though, opting for the standard fruit or a pandoro.  Most of the time I eat it as is, but every now and again I like to do something a bit different – see a few of my ideas here.

Another nice idea if summer goes rogue and it’s a cool night, is this very easy panettone pudding.

Ingredients
1 750g panettone
3 eggs
600ml light thickened cream
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
20ml brandy
40g unsalted butter
Extra butter, for greasing
1/3 cup flaked almonds
Icing sugar, for dusting
Vanilla ice cream to serve

Making it
Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees fan forced

Grease a baking dish, then tear the panettone with your hands into medium size pieces and put into the dish.

In a bowl, whisk the eggs, cream, extracts and brandy until well combined. Pour over the panettone and allow to sit for a few minutes. Cut the butter into small pieces and dot the panettone with it. Place in the oven for about 40 minutes until it becomes golden.

Meanwhile, lightly toast the flaked almonds in a pan then set aside. (You could also sprinkle the almonds through uncooked beforehand, and bake rather than adding afterwards).

Remove the pudding from the oven, dust with icing sugar and sprinkle with the almonds. Serve as is or with vanilla ice cream.

panettonepudding2panettonepudding1

There’s a lot of potential variations in this – you could add mixed berries in for baking, or other nuts such as pistachio for texture.

Buon natale!

 

In My Kitchen, November 2017

Welcome to the November edition of In My Kitchen.  It is drizzling as I type, some much needed rain hitting Sydney after an almost thirty year record dry spell.

In my kitchen is today’s Daily Telegraph featuring none other than Mamma Rosa!  A couple of weeks ago The Sorella told me Delicious and The Telegraph were in search of family recipes.  As many of you know I have my special little book, so I sent in her crostoli.  She was chuffed (but would have preferred no picture!).

imknov17 (6)

In my kitchen are brochures brochures brochures.  A few weeks ago with demolition and excavation in full swing at our “grand old lady”, as I sometimes call our house (or more often, our “falling down house”) we moved out.  We were loathe to leave, but safety became an issue.  With not much yet done except the land being cleared – which was a much bigger job than we thought –  and the original house being stripped, the builders and others were already asking which appliances were going in, where I wanted power points, and where the plumbing needed to run so had we decided on taps and toilets.  I haven’t bought any major appliances or household goods for ten years so it was time to look around.  A lot has changed since then, and in some cases I think there are just too many bells and whistles – if you knock, sing or pirouette your dishwasher and/or oven door will open (the knocking one is true, the other two probably aren’t far behind).

imknov17 (1)

A few weeks ago I went to one of the Sandhurst Festival of Nonna dinners, which was just lovely. We were given a couple of jars of Nonna’s Sugo.  I’m not usually one for bottled sauces, most of them are very acidic, but this one was really good!

imknov17 (2)

In my kitchen are home grown avocados, courtesy of a colleague’s dad.  Can’t wait till they ripen so I can try them.

imknov17 (3)

Just outside my kitchen are pots of herbs.  The house we are renting didn’t have much in the way of garden beds, so pots it is for now. At the Festival of Nonna dinner we met the Torrisi family who are long time large scale basil growers, and they gave us an interesting tip – that when you water basil, you should avoid watering the leaves, it apparently grows better.   Can’t be helped in the rain of course, but good to know otherwise.

imknov17 (5)

That’s it from the Napoli kitchen this month.  IMK is a global monthly link up hosted by Sherry’s Pickings – thanks Sherry!

LP’s Quality Meats, Chippendale

As many of you will know, we have a resident vegacaquarian in the Napoli household.  This has meant a largely vegetarian diet for the family, with seafood every now and again.   Regardless, the (Not So) Small People are die hard carnivores, and would happily demolish a steak every night of the week if it was presented to them.  So when their birthday rolls around, and a special family dinner out is called for, the request is always for a steak restaurant. “Would you like to try somewhere new or somewhere we’ve been before?” I ask, when the big day is approaching.  “Somewhere new” they say.  So here we are at LP’s which I’ve been keen to try since it opened in 2014. It’s consistently scored a hat in the Good Food Guide Awards.

There’s plenty of wood going on, between the communal tables, the tables, and the long bar, next to which a giant ham is being carved.  There’s a definite saloon vibe, and a cowboy hat or two would not go amiss. We are warmly welcomed and the staff all night are lovely.

I start with the chicken liver pate and it’s a winner. Great texture and flavour. I didn’t appreciate pate till I was an adult, and I encourage the Small People to try some. They don’t mind it. It’s served with some great big chunks of delicious sourdough rye.

lps (2)

The Marito doesn’t miss out, he starts with an Applewood smoked ocean trout, served with crème fraiche and capers. We are both pleasantly surprised by the generosity of the serve, and it has a lovely delicate flavour.

lps (3)

He also has an eggplant parmigiana with burrata. It’s not done traditionally but with crumbed slices of eggplant and stacked, which give it some nice texture. The burrata is gorgeous and creamy. The non meat specials change regularly; I notice a week later they have a crab with squid ink and spaghettini and would have loved to try it.

lps (4)

The Small People start with the sausage of the day, a cotechino. It has a good amount of spice and is really tasty though very rich and good to share.

lps (5)

Then comes out the 1kg t-bone steak. Beautifully cooked, they demolish it, though they do let me try a little bit.

lps (6)

On the side we try the potato gratin. The potato is sliced in paper thin slivers, and it’s creamy and buttery and delicious. We also have a green bean and radish salad; when we comment that someone has been a bit too heavy handed with the salt, they replace it with no fuss at all, a very good sign.

lps (8)lps (7)

There is no capacity for dessert after that meat-fest; the Small People are happy and on their birthday that’s all that matters.

LP’s Quality Meats, 16/12 Chippen St, Chippendale Ph 02 8399 0929
http://www.lpsqualitymeats.com

LP's Quality Meats Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Toque Time: the 2018 Good Food Guide Awards

gfg2018

This year, the Good Food Guide Awards was a national affair, rather than a shindig in each city. Why? Apparently “frankly, it was the right time”.  (This may be corporate speak for “we needed to cut costs, it’s tough in newspaper land right now”.)  So inner city and regional were all combined, and Northern Territory even got  a look in! Must have been a very long night.

There were specific gongs for certain categories, and the full list of hats below. Vale Jeremy Strode, how very very sad.

Restaurant of the Year: Attica, Victoria
New Restaurant of the Year: Saint Peter, New South Wales
Chef of the Year: Daniel Puskas, Sixpenny, New South Wales
Santa Vittoria Regional Restaurant of the Year: The Agrarian Kitchen Eatery & Store, Tasmania Vittoria Coffee Legend Award: Jeremy Strode 1964-2017
Josephine Pignolet Young Chef of the Year: Kylie Millar, Attica, Victoria
Food For Good Award: Orana Foundation, South Australia
Bar of the Year: Arlechin, Victoria
Sommelier of the Year: Raul Moreno Yague, Osteria Ilaria, Victoria
Wine list of the Year: Aria Brisbane, Queensland

Three Hats

NEW SOUTH WALES VICTORIA QUEENSLAND
Quay Attica Urbane
Sepia Brae
Minamishima

Two Hats

NEW SOUTH WALES VICTORIA QUEENSLAND
Aria Cutler & Co. Aria Brisbane
Automata Dinner by Heston Blumenthal Esquire (down a hat)
Bennelong Estelle by Scott Pickett Gerard’s Bistro
Bentley Restaurant & Bar Ezard GOMA Restaurant
Biota Dining Fen (new entry) Stokehouse Q
Cirrus (new entry) Flower Drum Wasabi
Est. Grossi Florentino Upstairs
Ester Igni (new entry) SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Firedoor (up a hat) Kuro Kisume (new entry) Hentley Farm
Fleet Lake House Magill Estate Restaurant
Fred’s (new entry) Lume Restaurant Orana
Icebergs Dining  & Bar O.My (up a hat)
Lucio’s Provenance WESTERN AUSTRALIA
LuMi Dining Rockpool Bar & Grill Cullen Wines
Momofuku Seiobo Rosetta (up a hat) Vasse Felix
Monopole Saint Crispin
Mr. Wong Spice Temple TASMANIA
Muse Restaurant Ten Minutes by Tractor The Agrarian Kitchen Eatery & Store
Ormeggio at The Spit Vue de Monde (down a hat)
Oscillate Wildly Woodland House ACT
Pilu at Freshwater Aubergine
Porteno (re-entry) Ottoman Cuisine
Restaurant Hubert
Rockpool Bar & Grill
Saint Peter (new entry)
Sixpenny
Tetsuya’s
The Bridge Room (down a hat)

One hat

NEW SOUTH WALES VICTORIA QUEENSLAND
10 William St A La Grecque 1889 Enoteca
4Fourteen (new entry) Amaru ​Blackbird Bar & Grill
Acme Anchovy E’cco Bistro
Aki’s Atlas Dining (new hatter) Gauge
Bacco (new entry) Bacash Harrisons by Spencer Patrick
Baccomatto Osteria Bar Lourinha Homage
​Banksii (new entry) Bistro Guillaume Kiyomi
Beach Byron Bay (new entry) Cafe Di Stasio Madame Rouge (new entry)
Bellevue Captain Moonlite (new hatter) Mamasan Kitchen & Bar
Billy Kwong Catfish Moda
​Bistro Molines Cecconi’s Flinders Lane ​Montrachet
Bistro Officina (new entry) Centonove Noosa Waterfront Restaurant
​Bistro Rex (new entry) Coda Nu Nu
Bodega Copper Pot Seddon (new hatter) Otto
Buon Ricordo Cumulus Inc. Rick Shores (new entry)
Catalina Da Noi Rickys River Bar & Restaurant
Caveau Donovans Sake Restaurant & Bar
​China Doll Doot Doot Doot (new hatter) Social Eating House
Cho Cho San ​Elyros Spirit House
Clementine (new entry) Embla Tartufo
Continental Deli Bar Bistro ​Epocha The Euro
Cottage Point Inn French Saloon The Fish House (down a hat)
Da Orazio Pizza & Porchetta Highline at the Railway Hotel The Hats
​Darley’s Ides ​The Long Apron (down a hat)
Eschalot Il Bacaro The Peak (down a hat)
Felix ​Kakizaki (new hatter) The Survey Co.
Fratelli Paradiso ​Kappo The Tamarind
Glass Brasserie Kazuki’s The Wolfe
Hartsyard ​Lee Ho Fook
​Harvest (new entry) ​Ma Cave at Midnight Starling (new hatter) WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Izakaya Fujiyama Maha Billie H
Jade Temple (new entry) Marion Il Lido
Jonah’s Masons of Bendigo Lalla Rookh
Kepos Street Kitchen Matteo’s Liberte
Lolli Redini ​Montalto Long Chim
​Long Chim (new entry) MoVida, Lulu La Delizia
​LP’s Quality Meats Noir Rockpool Bar & Grill Perth
Margan Restaurant, Nora The Shorehouse
Ms. G’s Oakridge (new hatter) Voyager Estate
Muse Kitchen (down a hat) Osteria Ilaria (new hatter) Wildflower
Nomad Oter
Otto Paringa Estate SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Paper Bird (new entry) Philippe (new hatter) Africola
Paper Daisy (down a hat) Port Phillip Estate ​Appellation
Pearls on the Beach Public Inn Botanic Gardens Restaurant
Pendolino Ramblr (new hatter) FermentAsian
Queen Chow (new entry) San Telmo (new hatter) ​Osteria Oggi
Restaurant Mason ​Source Dining Press Food & Wine
​Rocker (new entry) Stefano’s (down a hat) Shobosho
Rosetta (new entry) Stokehouse (re-entry) The Currant Shed
Sagra ​Supernormal The Pot by Emma McCaskill
​Sake (Double Bay) (new entry) TarraWarra Estate (new hatter) ​The Summertown Aristologist
Sean’s Panaroma Tempura Hajime (new hatter)
Sokyo ​Terrace Restaurant TASMANIA
​Sotto Sopra (new entry) The Point Albert Park Aloft
​Spice Temple (down a hat) The Press Club (down a hat) Dier Makr
St. Isidore (new entry) ​The Recreation (new hatter) Fico
​Stanbuli ​The Town Mouse Franklin
Subo Tipo 00 Stillwater
​Sushi e Tonka Templo
The Antipodean (new entry) Trattoria Emilia (new entry)
The Apollo Tulip NORTHERN TERRITORY
The Bathers’ Pavilion Wilson & Market (new entry) Hanuman
The Dolphin Hotel
The Gantry ACT
The Paddington Chairman & Yip
The Restaurant Eightysix
The Stunned Mullet Italian & Sons
The Zin House Lilotang
Three Blue Ducks (re-entry) Monster Kitchen & Bar
Tonic Otis Dining Hall
Town Pulp Kitchen
Uccello Temporada
​Yellow

A Sunday Savoiardi extravaganza

My godmother (or comare in Italian), who I adore, is a fabulous cook.  Like Mamma Rosa and others who grew up in Italy in the decades following the second world war, they took simple ingredients, often home grown, and figured out firstly how to make them go as far as possible, and secondly how to make them as flavoursome as possible.  Once in Australia they adapted and learnt new things and new ingredients – comare’s spinach and ricotta cannelloni crepes are to die for –  but may of the traditions and recipes remain true.

Also like Mamma Rosa, comare is a damn good biscuit maker, both of them can whip up amaretti and crostoli like nobody’s business.

A while back my comare bought me a particular plate of biscuits that I loved and I wanted to learn how to make them.  She called them savoiardi but was quick to point out that they aren’t “savoiardi della nonna”, the traditional variety.  So this morning comare and I met half way in Mamma Rosa’s kitchen for a Sunday baking session. Laughs were had, stories were told, hugs were given.

In typical Italian handed down fashion, there isn’t a strict flour measure.  It’s the good old phrase you’ll find even now in many an Italian cookbook: the flour should be “quanto basta” or “quanto se ne prende” (literally “however much is enough” or “however much it takes”, both extremely useful measures). You need a piping bag for these, the mixture is sticky and difficult to handle – if it is easy to manage with your hands then you know you’ve gone too far on the flour.

My comare’s savoiardi

These use only yolks, so you’ll have a dozen whites to use – so often after making a batch of these she makes almond bread.

Ingredients
12 egg yolks from large eggs, at room temperature
1 slightly heaped cup of caster sugar
1 cup canola oil
1 cup Grand Marnier liquor
2 teaspoons baking powder
Approx. 450-500g self raising flour, sifted

Making them

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees fan forced and line a tray with baking paper
  2. Using an electric mixer, whisk the yolks, then add the caster sugar and whisk until thick.  Then add the canola oil and the liquor and continue to whisk until combined
  3. Finally add the sifted flour and the baking powder and combine.  The mixture should be reasonably thick but quite stickysavoiardi (2)
  4. Put the mixture into a piping bag with a large attachment for biscuits (ie not one for pastry decorating).  Comare had a bad ass version, have to get me one of these. You can go for either ridged or smooth, but the ridges largely disappear as they rise. savoiardi (1)
  5. Pipe the biscuits to the desired length and then put in the over for 10-15 minutes until golden.

savoiardi (4)savoiardi (5)savoiardi (6)

So so good.

After we whipped these ones up, comare says “let’s make the other ones too”.  Who am I to argue?

Savoiardi della Nonna

These follow largely the same method, just a slightly different mix of ingredients.

Ingredients
6 large eggs, at room temperature
1 slightly heaped cup of caster sugar
1 cup canola oil
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
Grated rind of 1 lemon
2 teaspoons baking powder
Approx. 500g self raising flour, sifted

Making them

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees fan forced and line a tray with baking paper
  2. Using an electric mixer, whisk the eggs, then add the caster sugar and whisk until thick.  Then add the canola oil, vanilla extract and lemon and  continue to whisk until combined
  3. Finally add the sifted flour and the baking powder and combine.  The mixture should be reasonably thick but quite sticky
  4. Put the mixture into a piping bag with a large attachment for biscuits and pipe the biscuits to the desired length and then put in the over for 10-15 minutes until golden.

savoiardi (7)savoiardi (8)

Thank you comare xxxx

A Bromance and a Chinese dinner

Like me, one of my Sorelle also has two boys.  The bromance between her two and my Small People is a strong one; I often joke that we should park the four of them in an apartment and just pop in to visit once a week.  When the school holidays come around there is avid pestering by all parties to spend days and nights together.  So on the first Monday of these school holidays they were re-united, the joy on the occurrence giving the impression that they had not seen each other for months rather than weeks.

For dinner, my Sorella, who spoils them, took them all out for Chinese.   One of my Small People penned a review, which he insisted that I post.  I don’t think Terry Durack or Jonathan Lethlean are at risk just yet.

__

On a Monday night, we all had different thoughts of which restaurant to eat at. The choices were Italian, Chinese or the Hunters Hill hotel bistro. The Italian restaurant was closed so there was two choices and by a unanimous agreement, we voted to go to Chinese.

The restaurant was called Grand View Restaurant and it was called Grand View for a reason. The view from our position was very exotic as we saw the sunset.

grandview1

Once we were seated, we chose what to eat. We ordered prawn dumplings, 2 servings of dim sims, fried rice, chicken chow mein and sizzling beef.
On arrival, we were given prawn crackers. They were peculiar, they looked funny, they were light pink and we all described them as “a crispy, hardened texture”. I though they tasted like fish, and I decided it was best to save some space to eat all the rest of my meals. My brother had the same opinion as me. On the other hand, Josh and Max really liked them as an appetiser

The prawn dumplings came first. They were definitely the dish of the night for me. It was interesting to see how Josh and Max would like them as they had never eaten them before. We had mixed opinions about the dumplings. I loved them both taste and texture. Josh said, “I liked the texture but not the taste”. My brother said, “These were the best prawn dumplings I have had” and Max said “the dumplings tasted really good

grandview2Not long after, the pork dim sims were served. This was my first time eating them and all of us thought they looked like brains. We all seemed to like them even if they did look like brains. Josh and Max liked them with soy sauce whereas my brother and I though they tasted good in their original formgrandview3

Although we gorged on the dumplings, we still had enough room to eat the fried rice. My brother and I split the rice in half. The fried rice was definitely a highlight of the night for me. The flavours were well balanced and it was very easy to eatgrandview4

The chicken chow mein was served a while after the fried rice. I didn’t order it, but I was lucky enough to try some of Josh’s chicken chow mein. The chicken was cooked in an unusual way, with a slimy texture. It tasted good own its own but was better when mixed with the noodles and other componentsgrandview5

The final dish of the night was the sizzling steak. It looked very appealing with its sizzling effect, this made us satisfied. I thought there was too much marination, which took away the flavour of the meat. I thought it wasn’t my kind of thing to eat. Even with all the setbacks, I thought it was well presented and with less marinating, it would be bettergrandview6

Overall, I thought the restaurant did a very good job. I rate it an 8/10. I liked all the dishes and I should come back some time soon.

The Festival of Nonna

DSC02534

 

The Festival of Nonna celebrates the Italian matriarch, the epicentre of the clan, the recipes that have been handed down verbally by generation, without measurements but by feel, taste and a love of simple and fresh ingredients.  The series of dinners, being held in Sydney and Melbourne between 8 October and 26 October, feature Italian chefs and their mothers, Nonna to their children.

This evening we have Luca Ciano, who came to Australia from Milan Michelin starred restaurant Il Luogo, and his delightful mother Nonna Anita, at A Tavola in Sydney’s Darlinghurst.  She is full of energy and enthusiasm, in spite of having ended her 20 plus hour journey from Italy that morning, and just adorable.  Together they start making Anita’s Bolognese.  It begins with a classic “soffritto” of onion, carrot, and celery in olive oil, followed by the addition of mince of veal, pork and meat from an Italian sausage.  Red wine, crushed tomatoes, and bay leaves are next.  She also adds thyme, I’ll have to give that a try next time.  Like me, she does not include garlic, which would probably surprise a lot of people.

Such a sauce would typically slow simmer for hours, and Nonna Anita is a little mortified that we are tasting it before it is fully cooked, served with some fluffy gnocchi that Luca has whipped up in the blink of an eye in the meantime.  The gentle ribbing and arguing between them in Italian is very funny and reminds me of my conversations with Mamma Rosa.  There’s plenty of opportunity to chat to them both through the evening, as they hand out jars of special Festival of Nonna pasta sauce, and while we enjoy a beautiful and extensive Italian menu, accompanied by very drinkable prosecco and wine. The lighting is not great, so apologies for the photos which don’t do any justice to the food.

It is the nature of these special relationships, often developed in the kitchen, that led the Lubrano family behind Sandhurst Fine Foods to launch the Festival of Nonna last year. Mimmo, his wife and Nonna Geraldine, the Sandhurst Matriarch, are there that evening and I have a wonderful time talking to them.  I’ve always wondered why an Italian family company has a name like Sandhurst so it was great to ask them in person.  When they bought the farm in the 1960’s – then owned by a Russian, a Pole and an Englishman – it was called Sandhurst Farm and they never changed it.  Back then Geraldine and husband Vince ran a deli.  Vince was a fisherman in Italy before coming to Australia; neither of them really knew much about farming, manufacturing, and distribution.  But like many Italian migrants who came to Australia for a better life, hard work did not scare them and they seized the opportunity.  And so it began.

It was all in for the family, with their two sons Mimmo and Ray being embedded in the business from the beginning. I love hearing that the family still sits down to lunch every day, prepared by patriarch Vince who is 86.

Over time, they looked for other family businesses to work with who would provide them with the quality of ingredients they expected. Sitting next to us is a couple from far north Queensland, the Torrisi family, who’ve been supplying them all their basil for twenty years.  Similarly, the eggplant they use comes from a family in Mildura.  The importance to them of family relationships extends to long lasting business relationships.

DSC02545

I want to adopt Nonna Geraldine, and I’m sure she means it when she gives us an invitation to join them for lunch one day.  A few weeks ago I became Nonna-less.  I was very blessed in both my Nonnas – kind, strong, selfless and loving women who never breathed a word of complaint about the hardships they endured and the poverty of post war Italy.  My Nonna in Italy, who I am named after, had a wicked sense of humour and was remarkably open minded for one of her era.  I’ll never forget her laugh.

The Festival of Nonna, October 2017
http://sandhurstfinefoods.com.au/nonna/events/

Napoli Restaurant Alert dined as a guest of Festival of Nonna